Mimsy Were the Borogoves

Book Reviews: From political histories to bad comics, to bad comics of political histories. And the occasional rant about fiction and writing.

San Diego Comic Fest 2012!

Jerry Stratton, October 20, 2012

I’m off to what I think is the first annual San Diego Comic Fest 2012, “an old-school comic con brought to you by some of the same folks who produced Comic-Con in the ’70s.”

October 21, 2012: Competing with Kuttner

We are about to go in and see Scott Shaw’s Oddball Comics, the raw version. But since this is Mimsy Were the Borogoves, I wanted to put up this quote from Tim Powers talking about his early inspirations.

October 20, 2012: Twenty dollars of comics

Some random notes, as well as a photo of the comics I bought today. This is a great con.

At the San Diego Comic Fest, people still calling Comic-Con “the San Diego con”.

I think the same number of people are showing up for the panels here as do at SDCC comic book panels, but here they aren’t swamped by non-comics people and the gigantic turnouts for non-comics panels.

Once you believe that something doesn’t exist, you have absolute freedom as a writer to convey it. (Paraphrasing Vernor Vinge.)

October 20, 2012: Murphy Anderson

Drizzle turned to rain as I walked down the hill to Mission Valley, so our first stop was Café Frankenstein for Emergen-C and cheesecake.

“As a young lad I was appreciative of the way you drew women’s legs.”—Gail Carter, moderator of the Murphy Anderson interview.

Anderson was born in 1926, was working for Fiction House by the time he was twenty, if I heard right. Married in 1948, and his wife is in the audience. “It’s Fantastic.” In the middle fifties he started also doing work for DC under Julie Schwartz.

“Murphy Anderson gorillas are like no other gorillas in the world.” (I suspect that was to capture the Scott Shaw! market.)

About John Carter, they were aware of the character and how much he had influenced the superhero comics.

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